General Education (30 Units)

Advisement for General Education courses is offered on an individual basis.

ART 120 – Art History — (3 Units)
Prerequisite: None.
This course focuses on art history and art enjoyment with clear understandings communicated of art within civilization. The range of time includes the Paleolithic to Modern Art. The topics are aligned with both chronological developments, art movements and key concepts within Art History and Art Appreciation. This is an introductory course, which is designed to give the student a fundamental understanding of the creation and appreciation of diverse modes of expression through the visual arts. The course covers art within the context of Fine and Applied Arts.

ART 140 – Art History Rembrandt and Masters — (3 Units)
Prerequisite: None.
ART 120 is recommended but not required.

This course focuses on art history and art appreciation of the works of Rembrandt, his pupils, and other masters—through studying the key concepts of art. The student will gain a fundamental understanding of the creation of diverse modes of expression through the visual arts. The course covers art within the context of fine and applied arts.

ART 150 – Modern Art History — (3 Units)
Prerequisite: None.
ART 120 is recommended but not required.
This course focuses on contemporary art history and art enjoyment with clear understandings communicated of art within civilization. The range of time includes the Contemporary which is 1945 to now which is called either Modern Art or postmodern in the field of art history. The topics are aligned with chronological developments, art movements and key concepts within Art History and Art Appreciation. This course is designed to give the student a fundamental understanding of contemporary creation and appreciation of diverse modes of expression through the visual arts. The course covers art within the context of both Fine and Applied Arts.

ART 155 – Primitive Art History — (3 Units)
Prerequisite: None.
ART 120 is recommended but not required.
This course focuses on the history and appreciation of primitive art. The range of primitive art styles and techniques is explored through the artistic traditions of different regions of Africa.

ART 158 – Advanced Primitive Art History — (3 Units)
Prerequisite: None.
ART 120 is recommended but not required.
This course focuses on enjoyment of primitive art and the history of Pacific Islands (Oceania) art. Oceanic art will be studied within its cultural context and in comparison with African primitive art.

ART 160 – Asian Art History — (3 Units)
Prerequisite: None.
ART 120 is recommended but not required.
This course focuses on Asian art enjoyment and art history. The main focus of the course will be concentrated on the range of Asian arts from the artistic traditions of prehistoric to modern Asia in relation to their philosophical and other influences. The art and architecture of Central Asia and other Asian countries (India, China, Korea, and Japan) will be covered.

Optional examples from Southeast Asia, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Tibet, and Nepal will also be examined as related to student research.

ART 165 – Advanced Asian Art History — (3 Units)
Prerequisite: None.
ART 120 is recommended but not required.
This advanced level course focuses on a fuller understanding of Asian art enjoyment and art history. The full exploration of Asian art will be compared and contrasted with international art influences. Art from China, India, Korea, Japan, and Thailand will also be examined in relationship to their philosophical and other cultural dynamic influences.

MATH 165. General Mathematics — (3 Units)
Prerequisite: None.
A course designed for students in need of general mathematics skills. Topics include algebra, geometry and trigonometry, metric conversions and numerical computations as related to the various measurements needed within the manufacturing/shop environment.

MATH 175. Mathematics for Business Applications — (3 Units)
Prerequisite: A minimum of “C” grade in high school algebra and a minimum score of 60% on the algebra section of the math placement test, or permission of your professor.

Mathematics applicable to problems in business and economics. Includes sets; linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions; inequalities, matrices; differentiation; integration and extreme values.

BSCI 100A. Algebra I — (3 Units)
Prerequisite: High school algebra or MATH 165-General Mathematics.

This course is for those who have some general mathematics skills and want to move on to algebra. Topics include real number systems, linear equations and inequalities in one and two variables, system of linear equations, exponents and polynomials, and factoring.

BSCI 100B. Algebra II — (3 Units)
Prerequisite: BSCI 100A Algebra I or equivalent.

This course is the continuation of BSCI 100A and for those who want to further study algebra. Topics include system of linear equations, exponents and polynomials, factoring, rational expressions, roots and radicals, and quadratic equations. The first part of the course overlaps with BSCI 100A so students who have some algebra can take this course directly.

BSCI 100C. Pre-Calculus — (3 Units)
Prerequisite: BSCI 100B Algebra II or equivalent

Topics include the fundamentals of trigonometry and the trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities and equations, application to vectors, and sequences and probability.

BSCI 206. Physics I Mechanics — (4 Units: 3 guided instruction/1 lab)
Prerequisite: BSCI 102 Calculus II (3 Units)

BSCI 206 Physics I (Mechanics) covers fundamentals of Newtonian Mechanics and the physics of fluids, oscillations (including mechanical waves and sound), and addresses topics of heat and thermodynamics.

BSCI 208. Chemistry I — (4 Units: 3 guided instruction/1 lab).
Prerequisites: High school chemistry, BSCI 100B Algebra II.

This course is a 4 unit general engineering course that is a requirement for all engineering degrees. Chemical principles such as reactivity, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, atomic theory including bonding and kinetic theory, and gas laws will be covered.

Thinkwell is an electronic learning tool that presents the basic concepts appropriate for a college-level introductory course in chemistry. Chemical principles are presented using Notes (text) with Animations, Exercises (quizzes) and Video Lessons for each chapter. The laboratory component of the course is comprised of a variety of simulated lab experiments that are found within Thinkwell Animations and Video Lessons.

CS 150. Information Acquisition Using the Internet — (3 Units)
Prerequisite: None.

This course examines the history of and how the Internet has evolved in a relatively very short time from a tiny experimental internal network into a vast sophisticated and global system of networks that will probably never stop growing, and has had a significant influence on world society. We will learn about its origin, structure, security issues, and some of the many unique and related diverse technologies that now exist because of this expansive and complex network. Students will study how the Internet has evolved during the last twenty-five years and learn about the many interesting ways we have become dependent and rely on it daily in order to communicate, carry out transactions, exchange information, and efficiently accomplish many important personal and business oriented tasks.

CS 200. Fundamental Concepts of Information and Computer Technology — (3 Units)
Prerequisite: None.

This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of computers and a study of their basic logical function as it applies to technical systems. A short history of early computers and the researchers who were responsible for them is presented, including various types of codes that are all based on the binary and other modern numbering systems. The materials will introduce the student to various computer concepts and circuits, the central processing unit (CPU), and memory units.The student is introduced to logic gates, Boolean theory, and other numbering systems including binary, quaternary, octal, and hexadecimal. The CPU is further examined to illustrate the use of registers, program counter, and stack pointer. Assembly language programming is introduced and shows the relationship between it and machine code.

ENGL 120A. Communication: Composition and Comprehension — (3 Units)
Prerequisites: Approval of instructor.

Expository writing for students who have not completed a freshman writing course elsewhere. Emphasis is on content and form and the ability to express ideas in writing in an organized manner with logical reasoning and support. Students will be assisted in developing a sense of style. Includes analysis of varieties of academic prose and writing a minimum of five formal papers (4-5 pages each).

ENGL 120B. Literature: Introduction To Short Fiction — (3 Units)
Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of English 120A Communication: Composition and Comprehension or its equivalent.

Introduction to techniques and forms of prose narrative. Analysis of representative short and longer narratives and elements of plot, characterization, setting, theme and narrative voice. Critical writing is an integral part of course. Students will write a minimum of 3 formal papers (3-5 pages each).

HIST 120A. Survey of U.S. History: 18th and 19th Centuries — (3 Units)
Prerequisite: None.

This is an introduction and broad survey of United States History from its colonial
beginnings to the late 19th century. Political, social, and economic issues and their complex interrelationships will be the focus of the course. Differing historical interpretations and improving writing and basic research skills will be emphasized.

HIST 120B. Survey of U.S. History in the Twentieth Century — (3 Units)
Prerequisite: General Education requirements or permission of your professor.

This is an introduction and broad survey of U.S. History from the late 19th century to the present.  Political, social, and economic issues and their complex interrelationships will be the core focus of this course.  The scientific and technological revolutions of the late 19th and 20th centuries and their possible implications for the 21st century will be included.  Final chapters of the course cover the 21st century and current events.  Differing historical interpretations and improvement of writing and basic research skills will be emphasized.

HIST 120C. Introduction to Western Civilization I — (3 Units)
Prerequisite: None.

Teaches historically the significant elements in the Western heritage starting with prehistoric hominoids, the earliest Near Eastern Civilizations, and the classical Greco-Roman and continues throughout the 17th Century AD Age of Absolute Monarchies. This course is designed to further undergraduate students’ general education by introducing them to the ideas, attributes, and institutions that are the foundations of Western Civilization. Whenever possible an interdisciplinary approach using the arts, literature, the other social sciences, including archeology will be encouraged.

HIST 120D. Introduction to Western Civilization II — (3 Units)
Prerequisite: None.

Teaches historically the significant elements in the Western heritage from the Age of Absolute Monarchies to the present. This course is designed to further the undergraduate students’ general education by introducing them to the ideas, attributes, and institutions that are the bases of Western Civilization. The major cycles of Western and World history in their interactions, especially in the 19th and 20th centuries will be emphasized. Whenever possible an interdisciplinary approach using the arts, literature, and the other social sciences will be stressed.

HIST 120C. Introduction to Western Civilization I — (3 Units)
Prerequisite: None.

Teaches historically the significant elements in the Western heritage starting with prehistoric hominoids, the earliest Near Eastern Civilizations, and the classical Greco-Roman and continues throughout the 17th Century AD Age of Absolute Monarchies. This course is designed to further undergraduate students’ general education by introducing them to the ideas, attributes, and institutions that are the foundations of Western Civilization. Whenever possible an interdisciplinary approach using the arts, literature, the other social sciences, including archeology will be encouraged.

HIST 209. American Military History — (3 Units)
Prerequisite: None.

This course provides you with a historical perspective to decisions made by American military leaders. We will cover major military engagements from the colonial period through the current operating environment (COE). Although, many of you will have no battle experience by analyzing how the principles of war are applied to these engagements, and how leadership decisions affected the outcomes of battle, you can get insight from the experience of historical commanders.

PHL 100. Introduction to Critical Thinking — (3 units)
Prerequisite: None.

This Fifteen-week course in critical thinking and informal logic helps students develop the ability to reason clearly and critically. It includes an introduction to the disciplines of inductive and deductive logic, fallacious reasoning, and solving critical issues in thinking, and developing thinking techniques. Emphasis is placed on the identification and management of the perception process, use of assumptions, emotional influences, and language in various forms of communication.

PSC 100. The American Political System — (3 units)
Prerequisite: None.

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the development of the American political system with emphasis on decision making in the Legislation, Executive, and Judicial branches, constitutional interpretation and Federalism, and the input of political parties, interest groups and the Federal Bureaucracy.

PSC 150. Introduction to Geopolitics — (3 units)
Prerequisite: None.

This introductory course provides a foundation and critical examination into the field of geopolitics that builds a framework for students to explore and understand the complexity of international relations, world cultures, and global politics through text and film. Close attention is paid to the theories, methods and practices that make up the discipline and how such knowledge exchange informs and is informed by political practice. Topics of analysis include geography and politics, politics and space, geopolitical codes, global political agency, the state, nationalisms, international development and boundaries, terrorism, militarization and global security, views of world leadership, international law, and environmental justice.

PSC 200. World Governments and Political Institutions — (3 Units)
Prerequisite: None.

This course examines the scope and method of political science throughout the world. This course explores the social nature of politics, with a focus on how power and opinions are distributed throughout a variety of populations, institutions, and political entities. Students will analyze the effects of different cultures and media on political structures and decision-making processes, and will contemplate the affects of international relations and political changes on contemporary society.

SOC 100. Introduction to Sociology — (3 Units)
Prerequisite: None.

This course is intended to introduce students to some of the important themes, theories, methods of inquiry, and history of sociology span.__group0. Sociology offers a variety of interesting perspectives on classical and contemporary social dynamics. It explores ways of looking at the world that allow us to understand how the events and experiences of our lives are part of group dynamics, of social institutions, and of cultural meanings.