General Engineering

ENGR 201. Computer Programming for Engineers —(3 units)
Prerequisite: BSCI 100C Pre-Calculus, or equivalent
The student should be comfortable with basic algebraic techniques and trigonometric functions.

This course provides an introduction to the role of the computer for the solution of engineering problems. Basic programming techniques for numerical computation are implemented using the MATLAB language. Additional topics include an introduction to matrix operations and the use of special MATLAB functions for plotting and analyzing data.

ENGR 202. Computer-Aided Design for Engineers — (3 units)
Prerequisite: None. This is a BSE Elective course.
The course focuses on the reading, interpretation and preparation of engineering drawings, systems diagrams, flow charts, cutaway drawings and pictorial diagrams.  This course is an introduction to computer-aided design, 2D and 3D, solid modeling, and rendering using AutoCAD software.

ENGR 301. Engineering Economy — (3 units)
Prerequisite: BSCI 102 Calculus II (3 Units).
Engineering Economy is the discipline concerned with the economic aspects of decision- making. Examples of engineering decisions which depend on economic considerations include selection among design alternatives, evaluation of automation upgrades to a factory operation, and choosing among proposed projects within budget limits. All of these decisions require a systematic evaluation of the costs and benefits of the available alternatives.

ENGR 302. Engineering Materials — (4 units: 3 guided instruction/1 lab)
Prerequisite: BSCI 208 Chemistry I. In order to successfully complete this course, you should be familiar with Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, and Microsoft Power Point.
The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with the various materials used in manufacturing, the structure of a material, its processing, and its properties. The principal goal of a materials scientist and engineer are to make existing materials better and to invent or discover phenomena that will allow development of new materials, devices and applications. Engineers in any field or specialty can benefit from a thorough knowledge of materials science. The student will also learn to understand the constraints of material behavior in order to select the best material for a given application. The other important objective of this course is to understand materials science using the existing and current developments that are in the field presently. The diversity of applications and unique uses of materials are presented throughout the textbook, and the advances within nano-technology, energy technology, and biomedical engineering.

ENGR 303. Engineering Mechanics — (3 units)
Prerequisite: BSCI 206 Physics I: Mechanics
This course covers the principles of mechanics with emphasis on its applications in engineering structures. It is an introduction to more advanced courses in strength of materials and dynamics. Topics include vector analysis, equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies, applications to structures and mechanisms, introduction to motion and Newton’s second Law, momentum, work and energy and finally mechanical vibrations.

ENGR 304. Thermodynamics I — (3 units)
Prerequisites: BSCI 207 Physics II, BSCI 103 Calculus III
Fundamental principles of thermodynamics and their application to engineering systems, particularly energy conversion devices such as power plants, refrigerators and engines. This course will emphasize thermodynamic properties of pure substances in solid, liquid and gaseous phases as well as the first and second laws of thermodynamics.

ENGR 305. Basic Circuit Analysis — (4 units: 3 guided instruction/1 lab)
Prerequisites: BSCI 103 Calculus III, BSCI 207 Physics II
This course provides the basics of electric circuit analysis, starting with fundamental circuit laws, network theorems commonly used in circuit analysis, storage elements, and the responses of first-order and second-order circuits to dc and sinusoidal excitations. Dependent sources will be introduced, together with a brief introduction to power concepts and three-phase systems.

Laboratory assignments will run parallel with the course. They will be aimed at providing you with some experience in experimental techniques involving electric circuits, as well as reinforcing concepts you learn in the theoretical part of the course. These assignments will be conducted with the aid of computer simulation.

ENGR 306. Engineering Dynamics — (3 units)
Prerequisite: ENGR 303 Engineering Mechanics, BSCI 103 Calculus III.
Vector calculus and kinematics, equations of motion, energy and momentum principles applied to the dynamic behavior of rigid and deformable solids. Introduction to concepts and techniques of classical mechanics and dynamics, including time and force solutions to motions of mechanical bodies.

ENGR 307. Introduction to Logic Design — (4 units: 3 guided instruction/1 lab)
Prerequisite: BSCI 102 Calculus II (3 Units).
This course is designed for you to understand the implementation of the digital logic in a variety of digital systems. The course provides various methods and techniques suitable for a variety of digital system design applications. It also covers all aspects of digital systems from the electronic gate circuits to the complex structure of microprocessors. You will learn the basic concepts, such as Binary and related number systems, codes, Boolean algebra, combinational logic, and techniques of minimization, simple arithmetic operations, memory elements, flip-flops, digital systems organization, used in the design and analysis of digital systems and the principles of digital computer organization and design.

ENGR 308. Strength of Materials I — (3 units)
Prerequisite: ENGR 303 Engineering Mechanics(3 Units).
This course is an introduction into the core activity of an engineer: Design. It starts with the topic of determining the normal and shear stresses and strains in deformable bodies, and allowable stresses, then proceeds to: Mechanical material properties, axial, torsional, bending, and transverse shear loads, and their combinations. Determining principal stresses. Design of beams and shafts. Buckling of columns. Energy methods.

ENGR 496 A/B — (3 units each)
Upper division engineering elective credit. Credit can be given for upper division engineering courses taken at accredited universities recognized by the US Dept. of Education or CHEA and subject to approval by the Dean. Only grades of C or better will be transferred.

ENGR 498 Directed Study — (3 units)
Prerequisites: Approval of Dean; cumulative GPA of 3.0.
Exploration and/or research of a specific topic of interest to the student under the direction of a professor with prior approval from the Dean. A Final Report is required to document the directed study.

ENGR 499. Capstone Project — (3 units)
Independent design project in which the student selects a topic and with the approval of his/her faculty advisor, implements it by design, assembly, testing, and evaluation. Faculty Advisor approval is essential to the project conclusion.

ENGR 501. Graduate Engineering Analysis — (3 units)
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing, BSCI 104 Ordinary Differential Equations.
Analytical methods applied to the solution of advanced engineering problems. This will include solution of ordinary differential equations by iteration of infinite series. The study of Legendre Polynomials, Bessel Functions, Sturm Series, and the Eigenvalue Problem. Also the study of partial differential equations, using Fourier Series solutions,
and applying this to the solution of the wave and heat equations; and the solution of systems of ordinary differential equations and some of the applications.

ENGR 502. Graduate Engineering Statistics — (3 units)
Prerequisites: BSCI 102 Calculus II (3 Units).              
A study of advanced probability distributions, sampling theory, hypothesis testing, linear regression and estimation, advanced statistical applications and confidence intervals.

ENGR 503. Graduate Total Quality Assurance Management — (3 units)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
A study of the functions and responsibilities of the quality organization. TQM concepts, QFD, JIT, SPC, and all other continuous improvement tools will be utilized as part of this course focusing on TQM deployment. The focus of this course will be on the people, organizational and technical issues related to implementation of quality systems.

ENGR 504. Microprocessor Systems — (3 units)
Prerequisite: ENGR 307 Introduction to Logic Design.
This course covers Intel's 80X86 family of microprocessors, which is the most widely used architecture in today's microcomputer systems. The family includes both the 16-bit microprocessors and the 32-bit microprocessors. The 16-bit microprocessors include, for example, 8088, 8086, 80C186, 80C188, and 80286 processors. The 32-bit microprocessors include, for example, 80386, 80486, and Pentium processors. The course will address varieties of microprocessors, software and hardware design considerations, and applications to specific problems.

ENGR 596 A/B — (3 units each)
Graduate engineering elective credit. Credit can be given for graduate engineering courses taken at accredited universities recognized by the US Dept. of Education or CHEA and subject to approval by the Dean. Only grades of B or better will be transferred.

ENGR 598 Graduate Directed Study — (3 units)
Prerequisites: Approval of Dean; cumulative GPA of 3.0.
Exploration and/or research of a specific topic of interest to the student under the direction of a professor with prior approval from the Dean. A Final Report is required to document the directed study.